Yoga – it can help with everything from chronic pain to depression and PMS

1. Yoga and the heart. Yoga can make blood vessels relax and thereby reduce blood pressure while increasing blood flow to the heart.

2. Yoga can cure chronic pain in the back and neck. When practising yoga, the muscles first tighten, and then they relax when you breathe in and out. As the muscles relax, the pain begins to release.

3. Yoga and the brain. In a recent study published in the Journal of Neuroscience Nursing and performed at 133 older adults, those practicing yoga 30 minutes twice a week showed a better cognitive function than those who did not yoga.

4. Diabetes. In a study published in the Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research, 30 men with type 2 diabetes who practiced yoga for six months showed a significant decrease in their blood sugar levels.

5. Yoga to reduce stress. Practising yoga regularly can reduce the levels of the stress hormone cortisol, and especially in women at risk for mental illnesses.

6. Depression. A study in Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, showed that regular yoga practise reduced levels of anxiety in women with post partum depression. 

7. Yoga to fight PMSD. This time of the month you might feel like savasana is the only pose for you, but other positions may also relieve PMS symptoms.

From an article in yoga world

The powerful forest

The health benefits of spending time in nature has long been known. I recently read an article explaining why.

Nature has a way of strengthening our immune system, therefore reducing the risk of diseases such as diabetes, depression and cardiovascular disease. When we spend time in nature, the body enters a rest and digest mode, which is the opposite of the fight or flight mode we encounter when exposed to stress.

The researchers behind the article explain that there are chemical and biological substances in natural environments which can, among other things, bring down blood pressure, boost the immune system and reduce depression.

Nature is like a multivitamin that supplies us with all kinds of nutrition.

The article was published in Frontiers in Psychology

Do an Intoku today

Intoku is Japanese and roughly translates to; something good done in secret. A good deed carried out without seeking recognition or appreciation.

In times of blurred lines between what’s real and our filtered social media lives, this Japanese concept feels incredibly refreshing.

And isn’t it telling that there is no equivalent word in many Western languages?

What good do you do when no one is watching? Something you don’t share on Instagram?

Here’s a challenge. Do something for someone else today without telling anyone about it. The genuine good feeling you’ll get from helping someone is much more valuable than the appreciation you would get if you tell the world about it. When you remove the need for validation and the motive behind your action, only a pure, real feeling of happiness is left.

Be normal or be yourself

As we constantly project a polished, normal and successful life and are exposed to others’ equally amazing lives in our feeds, we risk forgetting who we really are.

Does the courage to be different come with age? Does the confidence to be original develop over time, with different experiences? Or do we need self-esteem to be ourselves?

As we constantly compare ourselves with others, do we risk diluting our beautifully weird and amazing personalities?

The world is more boring, less creative and dare to say; a worse place, the more normal we try to be.

Kipling on self leadership

‘If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster and treat those two impostors just the same…’

Rudyard Kipling

If you can keep your head when all about you

Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,

If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,

But make allowance for their doubting too;

If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,

Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies,

Or being hated, don’t give way to hating,

And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise:

 

If you can dream—and not make dreams your master;

If you can think—and not make thoughts your aim;

If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster

And treat those two impostors just the same;

If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken

Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,

Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,

And stoop and build ’em up with worn-out tools:

 

If you can make one heap of all your winnings

And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,

And lose, and start again at your beginnings

And never breathe a word about your loss;

If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew

To serve your turn long after they are gone,

And so hold on when there is nothing in you

Except the Will which says to them: ‘Hold on!’

 

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,

Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch,

If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,

If all men count with you, but none too much;

If you can fill the unforgiving minute

With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,

Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,

And—which is more—you’ll be a Man, my son!

 

Our trump cards 

There are things that beat all other things in life. Events that make other thoughts and worry clouds disappear. When these trump cards are played, your priorities suddenly become crystal clear and the problems that previously occupied your mind feel small.

These days my son is the mother of all trump cards for me. If he is in danger or even just hungry, I become a complete bulldozer ignoring everyone else’s needs, including my own. Particularly painful when he started walking at 9 months and went on kamikaze assignments around the house.

The other day my uncle past away. We were very close and for several days I cried when I thought about his life and what his immediate family is now going through.  Death, illness and family are other trump cards for me.

What are your trump cards? 

How can we be better at playing them every day without waiting for a crisis to reminds us of what’s important?

 

Pushing our buttons 

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Why are we disproportionately affected by certain events? Why do we find some things offensive – not just Insta-offensive?

A while back a friend told him that he resigned from his job after he discovered the management was unethical. He left for a competing organisation and was unfairly accused of stealing trade secrets. His world fell apart and he has still not recovered. Why was he so affected by a situation that someone else might have been able to laugh about over time?

Yesterday I was reminded of a similar experience I had. When I was on sick leave due to stress and at the same time got a new boss, my employer threatened to relocate me due to performance issues. This just six months after I had been selected as top talent. A Kafka-like process was initiated where no account was taken of my circumstances. I fought back with legal means and eventually made them change their position but I still today feel very bad when I think about it.

Why can’t I just brush it off as having the misfortune of working for an incompetent organisation and uncompassionate boss?

What sets my friend apart is his strong sense of justice and integrity. When these core values ​​were questioned, albeit on false grounds, it shook his world.

Similarly, I have understood that one of my fundamental values ​​is achievement. I have as long as I remember wanted to perform, that’s who I am. Even though I know I did a good job under the circumstances, a small part of me died when my performance was questioned. Just like in my friend’s case, my employer pressed the wrong (or right) button. My values were challenged.

One of the most powerful exercises I do with clients is to chart their core values.

Once you know where your buttons are, you can choose who will hit them, when and how.

How money can buy you happiness

We usually don’t equate money with happiness – openly at least. At a stretch we say money can make life easier.

Recently, I’ve been thinking about money in relation to time and freedom. How long should you stay in a job you don’t like? How much money do we need before we retire? Or if you start at the other end – how big of a house or car do you really need to be happy?

If toddler parents constantly struggle with time poverty – how can we get our hands on more time?

I read an interesting article from Psychology Today about money and happiness. It claims that there are 3 ways that money can actually make you happy. Buying time is one of them.

Unplanned Aimlessness

I am planning person, to say the least. When I tell people about my rolling 5-year personal plan in Excel they usually look like they’ve seen a green giraffe fly over the rooftops.

Every January, as part of my annual planning process, I update my 5-year plan, evaluate and rate previous year, develop guiding principles for the coming year and set 4-5 goals with associated activities for the new year.

Sounds like I should see someone about this?

Well it works for me. Half-year reviews with myself gives me an endorphin-high the size of a teenage kiss.

In 2016 I had no plan.

This was not a conscious decision and I didn’t even notice it until I sat down for my review in January. As the chock settled I realised that this was exactly what I needed last year. I guess a part of my brain somehow understood this but decided to keep quiet about it so I wouldn’t protest.

2016 was the year I overcame fertility problems, had a pregnancy fraught with complications, fought discrimination at work, had an emergency caesarean and became a mother. Trying to fit that into columns and rows would not have been a good idea.

Fate however smiled at my obsession with planning and arranged for my pregnancy to follow the calendar months, starting in January. One must have some order after all.

It makes me wonder – is it necessary to have a serial car crash in our lives to change deeply entrenched behaviours?

If we instead consciously change these behaviours do we develop just as much? Or even more?

Today I took time off my parental leave and wrote my 2017 plan. I am proud that I waited until February and that the plan doesn’t contain a single colour-coded rating system.

It is however still in Excel.

5 surprising things about becoming a mom

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1. The Mariana Trench of Love

I expected I’d sit and watch the baby for hours but I was not prepared for the bottomless love I feel for Otto. (The Mariana Trench is the world’s deepest oceanic area). He still feels part of my body in a way. Even more surprising is the intimacy I now feel with my partner. I thought the baby cuddles would fill my closeness quota, but no. I feel even greater love for my partner and want even more hugs and kisses. A very pleasant surprise.

2. Helicopter Mom Deluxe

I was convinced that I would be a chilled out mom. Someone who doesn’t use hand sanitizer before every meal or obsess over how warm the baby is. But how wrong I was. I have a helicopter mom default setting and almost feel physical pain when he cries. If someone coughs in the supermarket (the longest trip we have taken so far), I wish that there was industrial power antiseptic spray I could use.

3. Prestige flestige

I was happy to discover that I left most of my career and life performance anxiety in the delivery room. The fact that it took two weeks before I updated the blog after giving birth didn’t bother me at all. A nice side effect indeed. A sort of must-dos detox.

4. Total world isolation

I never understood the so called baby bubble before it hit me. People told me to ‘enjoy the bubble’ or ‘we’ll see you when you’re out of the bubble’. The less charming side of this bubble is perhaps that you don’t have time to read a newspaper, watch your favourite series or use conditioner when you shower. On the other hand the rather pleasant side of the bubble is that things that world affairs or my housing cooperative politics seems completely unimportant. That said, I couldn’t ignore the terrible saga of the US presidential election. On election night I for once appreciated the night feedings so I could follow the news coverage.

5. The mother of efficiency

I now have two settings. The first, a distraught, apathetic zombie-like mode that is often on after a rough night. The second, a hyper efficient mode when I can empty the dishwasher, pay the bills, do the laundry, update Instagram, call mom and bake a pie, all while Otto sleeps. I, who am usually a task master and have spent my life chasing efficiencies and multitasking, am in awe of myself as a new mother.

Preparing for an Ironman

Pregnancy week 41+ 4

So, imagine you’re planning to do an Ironman (a triathlon that ends with running a marathon) for the first time in your life. You’ve never even worn a wetsuit before but you know it will the be single most painful thing you’ve ever done.

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Me: So when will the race take place?

My body: Well, the planned date is in 40 weeks. The race will most likely take place between 37 to 42 weeks from now.

Me: Ok, but I’ll assume the race is in 40 weeks then. On October 11th?

My body: Well, only 4.6% of all races take place on the planned date.

Me: So you’re telling me that I should train, prepare mentally, buy all the gear, frantically Google everything that can possibly go wrong during the race and then wait with my bag packed every night for five weeks for a call from you telling me that the race is on?

My body: Yep. And if the race hasn’t started after 42 weeks they’ll push you into the water and give you lots of drugs so you can make it around the course. If you’re still not able to finish they will put you on a stretcher, put you to sleep and push you all the way to the finishing line.

Me: Ok, thanks. I’m pumped. #week41

Lottery jackpot – a vacuum extraction delivery

Will that be with or without an episiotomy?

I saw a questionably appealing offer on the midwife centre notice board today to join a scientific study.

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‘In the event that your birth would have to end with vacuum extraction, you would enter a random draw for either a having an episiotomy or not…’

For expecting women who are scared senseless of having a forceps or vacuum extraction birth lead to severe vaginal tears (including me and I assume most women), is this a tempting offer?

A bit of excitement and an element of surprise in the middle of a chaotic delivery is exactly what you need, right? Let’s not all jump in and register at once.

Scientific studies in all honor, but I will probably prefer the staff to make the right decisions during my delivery and not decided by a random draw. But maybe that’s just me.

To baby moon or not?

Shamelessly borrow and steal traditions from other countries, I say.

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We recently went on a spa weekend. The excuse? A baby moon, what seems to be an American phenomenon that really doesn’t exist in Sweden. A trip or weekend away as a couple before the baby comes along because, well because you can.

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We went to the Djurönäset Spa in the Stockholm archipelago. A 40 minute drive felt just about all my body could handle, even so we had to take a food and toilet break. We had an absolutely magic weekend with coffee on the cliffs overlooking the water, yoga and sauna. The coffee break was my thing. And it wouldn’t be our baby moon if we didn’t have a working session to write our birth plan. It became a sort of baby conference – highly recommended.

Now that this went down so well, maybe we should introduce the push gift tradition as well? Will bring this up at home.

Knits, root veggies and due date countdown

 

I took a short walk in the autumn sun today (giving thanks to my pelvic girdle for the steps I received). I love walks this time of year when the air is crisp but its still sunny. It’s nice to be able to dress warmly for once – at the moment the hot flushes mainly mean I walk around in my underwear and compression stockings. Convenient really as I’ve now outgrown most of my pregnancy clothes.

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Never before have I wished for the short Swedish summer to end. But then of course with this autumn comes the baby. Just nine days to go now, unless of course I go over by two weeks, in which case I have a 25-day wait ahead. How should one relate to the D-Day? It does feel depressing to add two weeks after counting down for 40 weeks, just to be sure. But perhaps it’s best way to avoid going mad.